Senate Resolution 157

Date: 1989

 

Description: This is a resolution passed by Congress commending Sioux City and Woodbury County citizens for the courageous community response after the crash of United Flight 232. The year before the crash Sioux City emergency response teams had undergone a revolutionary Disaster Preparedness program, which proved vital in responding to this disaster. The Air National Guard, police, fire, Sherriff’s office, and the Red Cross from all over Siouxland were ready and waiting on a nearby runway before the plane even crashed. Within an hour after the crash most of the passengers had been recovered from the wreckage and shipped off to local hospitals. St. Luke’s Hospital and Marian Health Center called in all their available nurses and doctors to help deal with the wounded, and their quick response also helped save countless lives. But the resolution does not just commend these professional rescuers, but the endless everyday citizens who reached out and helped. When the hospitals ran low on blood, hundreds turned up to donate. Citizens opened up their homes, providing blankets, clothing, food, and shelter to the crash victims. Briar Cliff College and Morningside College opened up available dorms to house the mass of volunteers that poured into the city.

 

This incredible community response warranted national attention for Sioux City. Magazines and newspapers from all over the nation commended Sioux City and its people. Letters from victims and their families, as well as from the city of Denver flew into the city to thank its citizens for their efforts. Sioux City also received national praise, such as in this Senate Resolution. The city received the All-America City award for the second time for their response. Though a terrible tragedy, the crash did provide some good outcomes. The Federal Aviation Administration modified all aircraft hydraulic systems so this disaster might be prevented in the future, and issued required instructions given at the start of every flight laying out what to do in case a disaster might occur.

 

Donor information not available.

 

On display

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